Category Archives: Boon News

Boon’s New Bonsai Work Shop

You are looking at the very first work shop taking place in Boon’s new place. The lighting is great. The space is larger. It is still a bit new looking, but great bonsai and teaching will be taking place here. That is a given.

Intensive students who, in a week, will be winging their way across North America have something to look forward to. This is definitely a “step up”.

You will only miss one thing. Jai no longer lies right in front of the entrance. He tends to stay closer to Boon. But you’ll get used to it.

A Historic Bonsai on Display Again

This bonsai belonged to Mas Imazumi. It spent some time under the care of Boon. But it is now out in the world for all to see. The new owner is Jeff, who has worked with Boon for the last few years to get it show-ready. Enjoy.

“Best in Show” at Midori Bonsai Club

California Juniper PT 2009This last weekend at the Midori Bonsai Show (California), Peter Tea took “Best in Show” with this California Juniper.

Here is the same bonsai in 2004 – using the other side: http://bonsaiboon.com/bib/bib2004/content/Img2004_01_11_115109_large.html

The tree has definitely matured as a bonsai.

Red Pine Bonsai Display

This Red Pine has not had a styling for a few years. Last year it had a severe cutback because the foliage was becoming too wide. It will be styled this year, after the summer foliage has harderned off.

According to the feelings of the membership, this was one of the favorite accents for the pine. It only lost by one vote. The stand was “ruled” to be too tall when you stood right in front of the display.

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Below is the (by one vote) winning accent plant with a wooden slab for the main tree. Bunjin bonsai are often shown on thin slabs  in Japan. But they never use the thick pieces of lumber that is too often used here in the US.   (Oops, I think an editorial comment just snuck out.)

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(Please note that you can enlarge the pictures by clicking on them, though the files are sort of large.)

Bonsai Accent Plants

As one of the administrators of this blog, let me make an invitation. Though this is a Bay Island Bonsai blog, anyone may comment on the posts and are invited to do so. So do not think that this is an exclusive site for B.I.B. members only.

At the last B.I.B. meeting we discussed another display. When it comes to bonsai accents, the artistic principle is that the accent should have a subtle flow back towards the main tree (in a two point display). The accent below was rejected by the membership because the flow back to the bonsai was too obvious. What do you think?

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Below is another bit that Boon taught the beginners. If the accent flows out of the display, it looks like it is not connected to the main tree.

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Heavy Bending in Bonsai Intensive

Here is a tree that belongs to Boon. In the intensive classes you get to do more advanced work on Boon’s trees, if he thinks you are ready. This  is going to be one of those courage-bends. Below you see a nice-enough tree, but Boon wanted a severe bend to bring the foliage a lot lower.

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Rory and John C are two experienced intensive students, so they got the prep-job on the tree before they all cooperated in the bending. bonsai 5,6-09 007

Below, when the sawdust must fly, give the job to a student. Sawdust is a good look for John.

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The bending was done with tools that Boon had brought back from Japan. The Japanese call the tools below “Jackie”.

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Below is the finished bend. It will take about 2-3 years for the tree to add enough wood for the bend to hold. In the fall, an intensive student will get the job of wiring this tree.

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Buttonwood Bonsai in Florida (Cont.)

So here are the pictures from this year (09). When the Buttonwood came out of the pot I got a real complement from an old-timer. He took one look at the roots and said, “I’m changing my soil.”

BW Roots FL

It is easy to to see the larger roots in the picture, but if you know buttonwoods, the white areas are just a fine mat of white roots. One student said he had never seen so many roots on his buttonwood. It is easier to convince people about my soil-mix when they see it.

The picture below is after cut back. There was no styling this time. Even though this tree was exhibited at the EPCOT Center in Orland, FL, it is still a tree in development. It was cut back this way to encourage bud-back and to quicken ramification.

BW 4th year FL